Archive for the ‘Insight’ Category

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Cynefin and emergency management

Posted by  Shawn Callahan —March 28, 2005
Filed in Insight

Thanks to Larry Irons on the AOK forum for pointing this reference out. In a paper entitled, ‘Believe in the Model: Mishandle the Emergency’, Simon French and Carmen Niculae apply the Cynefin framework to three emergencies: Three Mile Island, Chenobyl and mad cow disease. You can access the paper online (http://www.bepress.com/jhsem) by completing the guest reader form. […]

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Finding your previous thought might constrain your current thinking

Posted by  Shawn Callahan —February 1, 2005
Filed in Insight

Darren makes the following comment: “The potential danger is this could limit thinking rather than expanding it. If people are constantly reminded of their past point of view, could it not encourage many not to move forward, but to reinforce their thinking of old?” I guess like any tool, in the wrong hands it can […]

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E:CO – New Complexity Journal

Posted by  Shawn Callahan —January 5, 2005
Filed in Insight

E:CO is a new journal exploring the theory and practice of applying complexity science concepts to organisational issues. The entire content of the current issue is available online. Interestingly it includes a section called ‘classic papers’ featuring Ross Ashby’s (Ashby’s law a requisite variety) 1962 paper, Principles of Self-organizing Systems. I think the following papers […]

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Knowledge management map

Posted by  Shawn Callahan —January 3, 2005
Filed in Insight

One view of the various flavours of knowledge management.

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Advancing civilization

Posted by  Shawn Callahan —November 30, 2004
Filed in Insight

“Civilisation advances by extending the number of operations we can perform without thinking about them.” —ALFRED NORTH WHITEHEAD

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Types of Tacit Knowledge

Posted by  Shawn Callahan —November 26, 2004
Filed in Insight

There has been some discussion during November in ActKM about whether tacit knowledge can be captured. Opinion ranged from ‘definitely yes’ to ‘absolutely no’. This discussion reminded me of the distinctions made by Max Boisot between three types of tacit knowledge: Things that are not said because everyone understands them and takes them for granted. […]

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