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084 – Corporate Storytelling—Values communication with Indranil Chakraborty

Posted by  Anecdote International —November 17, 2020
Filed in Business storytelling, Corporate Storytelling, Podcast

How can you inspire your team to hold your company values? Listen to hear Indranil Chakraborty, one of Asia’s leading storytelling experts and an Anecdote Partner, unpack values communication.

Welcome to the third episode of our Anecdotally SpeakingCorporate Storytelling series! The series celebrates the paper we released at the end of October titled Corporate Storytelling—The Essential Guide. It is our definitive guide to corporate storytelling and delves into the myriad of ways you can apply storytelling in a business context. To access the paper, click here!

Thank you to Indranil Chakraborty (IC) for being part of this episode. If you want to connect with IC, click here.

Next week we will be joined by strategy and leadership experts and Anecdote’s partners in South Africa, Bernard and Tracey Swanepoel. The pair will share their knowledge of narrative insight. Stay tuned, you won’t want to miss this one!

For your storybank

Tags: values, corporate storytelling, respect, transparency

This story starts at 34:45

Often it is difficult for executive teams to agree on the meaning of their company values.

Indranil Chakraborty (IC), one of Asia’s leading business storytelling experts, collected numerous stories from one company and took them to a board room where the company’s senior executive committee members were meeting.

IC handed the stories over and said, “For the next half an hour, read these stories, and on a scale of zero to ten, write down how appropriate they are for the term transparency.”

After the half-hour had passed, IC tabulated the results. He found a bunch of stories that had low averages and low standard deviations, meaning most people believed they were not good stories. He also found some with high averages and low standard deviations, which were great stories.

Some people in the room believed they had read great stories showing transparency, and some completed disagreed. The committee had a 45-minute discussion, using stories to clarify what each member was thinking, and finally came to a common understanding.

If IC had asked the committee members to agree on defining transparency, they would have been fighting over written paragraphs, and these would have been incredibly prone to interpretation.

About  Anecdote International

Anecdote International is a global training and consulting company, specialising in utilising storytelling to bring humanity back to the workforce. Anecdote is now unique in having a global network of over 60 partners in 28 countries, with their learning programs translated into 11 languages, and customers who incorporate these programs into their leadership and sales enablement activities.

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