Archive for 2007

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Finding success stories

Posted by  Shawn Callahan —February 14, 2007
Filed in Anecdotes, Business storytelling

Have you ever been asked to find success stories and been unsure where to start? Done well success stories slide effortlessly from one teller to the next conveying company values, strategic directions and the good reasons why your company should invest in initiatives like communities of practice. Done badly the stories remain captive and moribund in content […]

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Where are we at with Zahmoo?

Posted by  Shawn Callahan —February 13, 2007
Filed in Business storytelling

You might be wondering what is happening with Zahmoo? The main reason for the delay is our busy lives at Anecdote. Zahmoo is a labour of love and while we have made great progress and actually have an alpha version of the software working, I’m holding things up with a list of things I need […]

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Truth or verisimilitude in story work

Posted by  Shawn Callahan —February 13, 2007
Filed in Business storytelling

The Master gave his teaching in parables and stories which his disciples listened to with pleasure – and occasional frustration, for they longed for something deeper. The Master was unmoved. To all their objections he would say, ‘You have yet to understand, my dears, that the shortest distance between a human being and Truth is […]

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A great place to open space

Posted by  Mark Schenk —February 10, 2007
Filed in Anecdotes, News

I spent the past few days facilitating an event at the Mountain Heritage Resort at Katoomba, in the Blue Mountains outside Sydney. It is a great place to run open space events with lots of comfortable nooks and crannies (both indoors and out) for groups to work on issues and a main room big enough for […]

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Knowledge services by Guy St. Clair

Posted by  Shawn Callahan —February 8, 2007
Filed in Fun

Last night I went along to a talk by Guy St. Clair held by the KMLF and VPSCIN. I found Guy’s topic of knowledge services quite interesting. Guy comes from a libraries background but now takes a wider view of how to integrate information management, KM and strategic learning. One idea that stuck was the […]

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Re-establishing trust requires an apology

Posted by  Shawn Callahan —February 7, 2007
Filed in Collaboration

Everyone in knowledge management acknowledges the vital role trust plays. “Trust is the bandwidth of communication” says Karl-Erik Sveiby. When talking about trust I mostly hear people say “we need to build trust”. But I rarely hear people discuss the issue of what to do when trust is broken and needs to be rebuilt. See […]

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What is happening to Melbourne’s trains?

Posted by  Shawn Callahan —February 6, 2007
Filed in Collaboration

There is something peculiar going on with Melbourne’s trains. A couple of years ago we received a new fleet of brand new Siemens trains and everything worked fine. This year the same trains have a mysterious and serious problem: they don’t stop when and where the driver wants them to. The brakes seem to have […]

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Value Networks Masterclass in New Zealand with Verna Allee

Posted by  Shawn Callahan —February 5, 2007
Filed in Events

If you are in New Zealand in early March (1st-2nd) you might like to attend this workshop that will be run by Ross Dawson and Verna Allee. Trends in the Living Networks: Value Networks Masterclass in New Zealand with Verna Allee.

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The Craft of Connection

Posted by  Shawn Callahan —February 4, 2007
Filed in Communication

by Tim Laseter and Rob Cross Charlottesville, Va., January 31, 2007 — A growing number of companies, including Chevron, Halliburton, and Whirlpool, are seeking new methods to stimulate innovation and streamline global practices. By mapping the relationships between key thought leaders within a company, executives can bolster innovation by building connections between critical employees — […]

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How to store your Moleskine PDAs

Posted by  Shawn Callahan —February 3, 2007
Filed in Fun

From the time of the first bound books, right up until the 17th century, books were shelved with their spines facing inwards and the pages facing out. There was a practical reason for this seemingly perverse practice. Books were typically bound in leather and the technology for decorating a book was primitive. Bookmakers applied embellishments […]

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