Archive for the ‘Strategy’ Category

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Knowledge management fact – collaboration degrades when people are further apart

Posted by  Shawn Callahan —December 6, 2006
Filed in Strategy

Mark and I have been helping clients with knowledge strategies lately and as we write them up we would remember  knowledge management ‘facts’ like, “knowledge transfer significantly degrades when people are separated by more that 18 feet.” You know how it is, you remember something like this but where is the original research. So I […]

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Social network perspective of knowledge-retention strategies

Posted by  Shawn Callahan —October 30, 2006
Filed in Strategy

Salvatore Parise, Rob Cross and Tom Davenport have teamed up to write an article for Sloan Management Review titled: Strategies for Preventing a Knowledge-Loss Crisis. It’s a description of how Organisational Network Analysis can be used to identify people who would be sorely missed if they left the organisation. They focus on three social network […]

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Tag lines for knowledge strategies

Posted by  Shawn Callahan —October 13, 2006
Filed in Strategy

We’ve been helping a few organisations with knowledge strategies lately and discovered the power of knowledge strategy tag lines. This idea first came to us while we were working on trust in one of the large Australian banks. They’d done a traditional mission, vision, values exercise (which are normally ineffective) but one of the values kept popping up […]

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Three-dozen knowledge sharing barriers

Posted by  Shawn Callahan —September 3, 2006
Filed in Strategy

Yesterday I read a paper by Andreas Riege with the title, Three-dozen knowledge sharing barriers managers must consider. It’s a literature review that lists sets of potential knowledge-sharing barriers. The lit review has one major omission I noticed; there is no mention of Gabriel’s Szulanski’s work on knowledge sharing barriers (see references below). The list is worth […]

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Neuroscientific look at change management

Posted by  Shawn Callahan —June 9, 2006
Filed in Strategy

Here is an interesting article which reports on a range of neuroscience research on how people respond to change. The article explores the following conclusions: Change is pain. Organizational change is unexpectedly difficult because it provokes sensations of physiological discomfort. Behaviorism doesn’t work. Change efforts based on incentive and threat (the carrot and the stick) […]

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David Maister’s latest article: Strategy Means Saying “No”

Posted by  Shawn Callahan —May 24, 2006
Filed in Strategy

I was flattered to read that David Maister recently quoted me in a recent article on strategy based on a comment I’d made on his blog. I was making a point about how the stories staff hear about senior management will only change if senior management acts in new ways worth retelling. These new stories then change the perceived […]

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The problem with strategic planning

Posted by  Andrew Rixon —October 5, 2005
Filed in Strategy

It’s interesting how many organisations do strategic planning and yet how little value is considered to be delivered as a result. In an article called Eight problems with strategic planning a few points tweaked my interest. Does our process produce a plan that’s “real?” Does our plan really work for the organization? Is anybody doing anything? The danger […]

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Part of McMaster’s book, The Praxis Equation, is online

Posted by  Shawn Callahan —April 25, 2005
Filed in Strategy

Denham Grey points us to what appears to be a very interesting book: Michael McMaster’s  The praxis equation. Design principles for intelligent organisation. I Googled the title and found that a couple of chapters are published online. I found one of the design principles quoted by Denham a little curious: Without a starting hypothesis discovering […]

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Enhancement to knowledge strategy

Posted by  Shawn Callahan —November 30, 2004
Filed in Strategy

A couple of years ago I developed a simple approach to developing knowledge strategies. The premise was simple–that a strategy should incrememtally enhance the ‘knowledge environment’ and that this could be done by implementing a series of tangible initiatives. Each initiative should be coherent with how people view knowledge (the framework) and how they leverage […]

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