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Have a merry christmas…

Posted by  Andrew Rixon —December 20, 2005
Filed in Fun

Finally after some busy months since the anecdote team grew, coupled with some SNA work, it is now time for christmas. I’m sure looking forward to it. My wife and I are jumping in the car and heading to Dubbo (and its zoo), Moree for christmas with my family and then Brisbane for the new year with my wife’s family. I will be back in Melbourne, ready to blog on January 5th 2006.

In the meanwhile, I’ve pulled together a few quotes which I enjoyed, and maybe you might too…

It takes a thousand voices to tell a single story.
-Native American saying

The universe is made of stories, not atoms.
-Muriel Rukeyser

If you don’t know the trees you may be lost in the forest, but if you don’t know the stories you may be lost in life.
-Siberian Elder

Australian Aborigines say that the big stories-the stories worth telling and retelling, the ones in which you may find the meaning of your life-are forever stalking the right teller, sniffing and tracking like predators hunting their prey in the bush.
-Robert Moss, Dreamgates

“There have been great societies that did not use the wheel, but there have been no societies that did not tell stories.”
-Ursula K. LeGuin

“The tale is often wiser than the teller.”
-Susan Fletcher (as Marjan, in Shadow Spinner)

Storytelling reveals meaning without committing the error of defining it.
– Hannah Arendt

It is not the voice that commands the story: it is the ear.
-Italo Calvino  1923-1985, Cuban Writer, Essayist, Journalist

One good anecdote is worth a volume of biography.
-William Ellery Channing  1780-1842, American Unitarian Minister, Author

About  Andrew Rixon

One Response to “Have a merry christmas…”

  1. Jean-Marc Says:

    Hello,
    I was quite surprised when I read that Italo Calvino had been put in the category of Cuban writers. The reality is that he is an Italian writer, as his 1st name suggests.
    By the way, when Italo was born, Italy was ruled by Benito Mussolino and his government was subsidizing families granting Italo or Italia as their children’s 1st names to … Hence, Calvino’s name.
    Best regards
    Jean-Marc

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